Tag Archives: The Last of Us

Logan (2017)

I literally just got back from watching the highly anticipated Logan, supposedly the last time we will ever see Hugh Jackman as the clawed superhero that first made him famous 17 years ago. And in all honesty, I am still stunned by just how good it is. After the maligned X-Men Origins: Wolverine and the better-but-not-good-enough The Wolverine, we finally have a Wolverine standalone film that does the iconic character justice.

As the title of the film suggests, Logan is a deeply personal story about an aging, struggling Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) whose powers are fading. The only thing keeping him going is his sense of obligation to Professor X (Patrick Stewart), whose failing mental faculties make him an extremely dangerous mutant. As the trailers and posters foreshadow, a young girl named Laura is thrust into his life, turning all his plans upside down and setting the wheels of the narrative in motion.

The X-Men films have never really cared about continuity, and it would be wise to not get caught up in all the nitty gritty of past entries in the franchise. In fact, you don’t need to have watched a single X-Men film to get this movie or really enjoy it. It actually works perfectly as a standalone. All you really need is to know that it’s set in the not-too-distant future and have a general idea of who the characters are and what mutant powers they possess, because director and co-writer James Mangold does a fabulous job of immersing audiences in the world of the story without an excessive amount of exposition. But of course, if you’ve followed Jackman’s version of the character for 17 years, the bittersweet nostalgia gets pretty heavy too.

What drew me so much to Logan in the first place was the first trailer, which felt eerily similar in story and tone to The Last of Us (in my view the best video game of all time), which is about a disillusioned, bearded, middle-aged man and a young girl trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world. I’m glad to say that Logan isn’t that similar to The Last of Us in premise, but it does have shades of what made the video game so engrossing — the characters, the character development, the relationships, and the world building. And that’s what really makes Logan a success — you feel for the characters and you feel their hopes and their pain. In many ways, it’s a film that transcends the superhero genre. It is indeed a superhero movie and an action flick, but it’s also a road movie, a hard-hitting drama, a western, and a movie about cross-generational relationships. I was really surprised by how much I was moved by it.

Logan is also the first R-rated Wolverine film, and it certainly does not waste that classification. From the very first scene and line of dialogue, the film lets you know that it doesn’t intend on holding back, delivering f-bombs and copious amounts of brutal violence, blood and gore. Those used to the more tame X-Men films might find it jarring at first, but let’s face it — what do you expect when someone waves those sharp metal claws around like that? Personally, I didn’t find the violence gratuitous — it only added to the realism and the raw emotion of the film. Besides, it’s not just the violence either, as the story itself is really dark and tackles some very depressing issues. A PG-13 version of this movie just would not have worked.

Both Jackman and Stewart deliver what are easily their best performances in the X-Men franchise to date. Admittedly, part of it is because of the story and the added screen time their characters have been given, but they really do make the most of it. This felt like the kind of Wolverine movie Jackman had wanted to make back in 2009 and again in 2013, one where it’s really about who the character is as a person rather than his claws.

As good as they both are, newcomer Dafne Keen absolutely steals the show as the mysterious young girl named Laura. She is just unbelievably badass in this movie and I would love to see her (or at least her character) featured in future X-Men films.

The rest of the supporting cast is fantastic as well. It took me a while before I recognised him, but towering comedian Stephen Merchant is great as albino mutant Caliban, while Boyd Holbrook (Run All Night, A Walk Among the Tombstones, Morgan) surprised me with how good he is as Donald Pierce, the leader of a security squad working for a scientist played by British film veteran Richard E Grant. Special props too to the actor who plays the main supervillain of the film, who shall remain unnamed.

No movie is perfect, though the only main complaint I have regarding Logan — apart from a couple of minor logistic quibbles — is the 137-minute length, which could have had a few minutes here and there trimmed (120-125 minutes would have been perfect). That said, I never found the film slow, even during its more contemplative moments, and I wouldn’t mind seeing an extended cut that’s even longer.

There are going to be a lot of blockbusters coming out in the next few weeks (Kong: Skull IslandBeauty and the Beast, Life), but I would be very, very surprised if any of them even come close to the awesomeness that is Logan. What a way to send off Hugh Jackman’s version of the character. Logan is the best Wolverine movie ever, the best X-Men movie ever, and one of the best superhero movie of all time. It’s that good.

5 stars out of 5!

The Girl with All the Gifts (2016)

With the film adaptation of The Last of Us — in my opinion the greatest video game of all time — looking less and less likely by the day, I decided to check out the movie people are calling the next best thing: The Girl with All the Gifts (well, at least until Logan comes out later this year).

Yes, it’s a low budget British film, but I was still surprised how little buzz the film received, especially considering that it stars two very recognisable names in Gemma Arterton and Glenn Close. And it’s a post-apocalyptic zombie movie too, and the genre is super popular these days.

Whatever the reason, the world is missing out on a great zombie movie, one that would have easily been the best of the year but for the awesome Train to BusanThe Girl with All the Gifts is intriguing, thought-provoking, tense, dramatic, and above all, pretty darn horrific. It’s an excellent standalone film that ticks all the boxes, including being based on a celebrated genre book (by MR Carey).

I don’t want to give away too much, as part of the pleasure of this movie is gradually discovering the world in which it is set. But basically, the film starts off in a future in which a bunch of kids are kept in cells as prisoners and rolled out in wheelchairs every day to undergo lessons given by a teacher named Helen (Gemma Arterton). There is one young girl, played by the phenomenal newcomer Sennia Nanua, who appears to be particularly intelligent and makes a connection with Helen, much to the displeasure of a military sergeant (Paddy Considine). Meanwhile, Glenn Close is hanging around as a mysterious authority figure.

The trailers and other synopses give away a lot more than that, but I would advise trying to stay away from such spoilers and finding them out for yourself throughout the movie. I love that sense of not knowing what’s going on and having to figure it out from the hints that the film drops. Having said that, I have noted that the film has been hailed as “similar” to The Last of Us, so you can probably connect the dots, though I will also say that there are sufficient differences in both premise, plot and characters to give audiences a fresh experience.

The biggest strength of The Girl with All the Gifts is the girl, Sennia Nanua, who just steals every scene she is in with this blend of innocence, curiosity and fear. It’s a remarkably self-assured performance that carries the film from start to finish, and really helps audiences empathise with her character and care about her fate. As with most zombie movies, it’s the characters that make all the difference. You know the kind of quality you’re getting with veteran actors like Arterton and Close, so I was pleasantly surprised by how Nanua dominated the film with her presence.

The zombies in the film are fantastic and look, as far as I can tell, like they are played by real people in most of the scenes as opposed to CGI. They’re genuinely freaky, and director Colm McCarthy does a great job of utilising their characteristics to build suspense and deliver thrills. The set designs and visuals of the landscapes do remind me a lot of The Last of Us, so I do wonder if McCarthy has played the game and/or is a fan of it.

The main negatives about the film are some of the rules regarding how the zombies operate, which don’t appear to be consistent or logical all the time. There are also parts of the movie, particular in the beginning, that have that ugly greyish tone a lot of British movies have (and signifies boring), which is the main reason why it took me a little while to fully get into it.

In all, The Girl with All the Gifts still gets a big two thumbs up from me. Intelligent, scary, provocative and heartfelt, it’s everything I want from a Last of Us adaptation if they ever get around to it.

4 stars out of 5

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials (2015)

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The Maze Runner was one of my surprise hits of 2014. I know a lot of people didn’t like it, or even hated it, but I loved the concept, the intrigue and the action sequences. I even went as far as saying that it should be considered an A-grade teen franchise like The Hunger Games.

And so I was very excited to see the sequel that was destined to happen after the first film made back the budget 10-fold. I’ve heard some people say that Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials is an improvement over its predecessor, though I must say I respectfully disagree.

I haven’t read the books and don’t intend to, though I hear that the film diverges from its source material quite a bit. The film’s story picks up not long after the first movie ended. The kids from the maze, led by Thomas (Dylan O’Brien), are in danger right off the bat, and shortly after they meet a mysterious new character named Janson — played by Aiden Gillen, otherwise known as the notorious Littlefinger from Game of Thrones. Jason says he wants to help them out, but of course, if you know anything about Littlefinger you’ll know that things aren’t quite what they seem.

Much like other teen series that achieve success after the first book, the Maze Runner sequel feels somewhat arbitrary in that it starts resorting to less original ideas. I thought the maze idea was fantastic in the first film, but of course they can’t just recycle the exact same approach. And so the story goes down another well-trodden path — the road trip.

Yes, just like Insurgent, the second film in the Divergent series, Scorch Trials takes the characters on an adventurous journey from point A to point B for some reason. They encounter new people, overcome new obstacles along the way, and try to keep one step ahead of baddies chasing after them.

As a result, the film feels more contrived to me. The intrigue is not built into the plot like the maze, and so screenwriter TS Nowlin and director Wes Ball (who also directed the first film) had to manufacture ways to maintain the mystery. No one they meet is “straight up” — they all act mysterious, don’t answer questions and love to say, “Follow me,” without explaining anything. Honestly, just about every new character that appears on screen utters that phrase.

At 131 minutes, it’s also about 10-15 minutes too long, and watching it I could tell there was fat around edges that could have been trimmed. Yet despite the length, there’s actually not as much character development this time around, though on the plus side we do get to find out more about what’s going on. I also think it’s a smart move to make WCKD, the shadowy organisation seemingly behind it all, morally ambiguous, so that you have to make up your own mind whether they really are the bad guys.

Notwithstanding to the amazing CGI renderings of the desolate landscape of the outside world, the most appealing aspect of the movie is still the action, which is again executed really well, with multiple heart-pounding sequences that kept me on the edge of my seat. There’s a lot of frantic running and chase scenes that utilised the shaky-cam, something I ordinarily hate, though in this case it was acceptable as it did add to the intensity and was used sparingly enough to avoid nausea.

Interestingly, the film also has quite a few horror elements and actually works best when it’s in scare mode (as opposed to mystery or adventure mode). For the video game fans out there, however, the film gave me a sneaking feeling that it was ripping off perhaps the best game of all time, The Last of Us. From one perspective, that’s great, because The Last of Us is so awesome, but on the other it worries me that we’re getting too many Last of Us wannabes, to the extent that when the real Last of Us film adaptation finally comes out we’ll all be too exhausted to be impressed.

The cast was a pleasant surprise to me too. Dylan O’Brien is as good as playing Thomas as he was last time, and the film also brings back the welcome familiar faces of Newt (Thomas Brodie-Sangster — aka Jojen Reed from Game of Thrones), Minho (Ki Hong Lee) and Teresa (Kaya Scodelario). I liked the dynamics between these characters and was glad that the relationships didn’t veer towards the teen cliches we’ve seen a zillion times before.

Apart from Littlefinger, the biggest new addition to the franchise is Rosa Salazar’s Brenda, yet another actress who has hit 30 still playing a teen. The other notable teen character is played by the film’s third Game of Thrones alum, Nathalie Emmanuel, aka Missandei, who has a small role.

There are lots of big names among the “adults.” Patricia Clarkson returns as the head of WCKD, while Breaking Bad’s Giancarlo Esposito, aka the legendary Gus Fring, joins the cast as Jorge, the leader of a new group. Barry Pepper, Lili Taylor and Alan Tudyk all have smallish roles too.

With so many big names and excellent special effects and action sequences, it’s hard to believe that Scorch Trials was made for just $61 million and has already nearly doubled that in box office takings. That means we’re guaranteed to get Maze Runner: The Death Cure, which I am so glad to say WON’T be split into two films. Massive kudos to all involved in that decision.

I said at the start of this review that I believe Maze Runner is on the same level as the Hunger Games franchise  not necessarily as good, but at least they share an identical plane. Admittedly, Scorch Trials has its fair share of flaws and for me is a notch below its predecessor, but the more I think about it the more I like it, and I am still of the opinion that the notion stands.

3.5 stars out of 5