Tag Archives: Lizzy Caplan

Movie Review: The Interview (2014)

interview

Let’s face it, the Sony hacking incident was the biggest blessing for The Interview, the most talked-about movie of 2014. Without all the furore, it would have been just another shitty Seth Rogan comedy, albeit one about two entertainment industry morons hired by the CIA to assassinate North Korean supreme leader Kim Jong-in.

I too watched it out of curiosity more than anything else, with the hope that the low expectations created from the bad reviews would improve my overall impression of the film.

And for the first half or so, The Interview was exceeding my expectations. As anticipated, Seth Rogan and James “freak” Franco basically played versions of themselves, which is irritating but not the worst thing in the world. The introduction to Franco’s gossip entertainment show, Skylark Tonight, was a brilliant segment featuring Eminem where we learned that Rogen, the show’s producer, is the straight face of the comedy duo. They followed this up with a few more interesting set pieces such as the Rob Lowe sketch, the setting up of the interview itself and the subsequent CIA training with Lizzy Caplan.

Even the first few scenes after their arrival in Pyongyang contained some solid laughs, and by this stage I was wondering why people appeared to hate this movie more than any of Seth Rogen’s other efforts. I grew optimistic that The Interview could best arguably Rogen’s two best films, This is the End (which I didn’t even like that much) and Pineapple Express.

Ironically, it was when the subject of the interview, Kim Jong-un (Randall Park) appeared on screen that the film began  accelerating downhill. After about half a dozen of laugh-out-loud moments in the film’s first hour — the rule of thumb for a good comedy — I didn’t laugh again. Not once.

Part of the blame has to go to the directors, Seth Rogan and his buddy Evan Goldberg, and another part has to go to the screenwriter, Dan Sterling. It was as though they did not know how to handle Kim’s character. They had the right idea with the daddy issues, the deceit, and the secret love of American culture, but the execution was flat and the punchlines lacked, well, punch.

The main culprit, however, was probably Randall Park, or at least whoever cast him in the role. Park’s version of Kim was simply not comical enough. I know he put on weight for the role, but the added girth simply gave him the heavy look, not the tubby, pudgy cuteness Kim has going for him. Kim looks and feels like a petulant chubby kid, whereas Park comes across as a full-grown man with a mean streak in him. Whether it was the look, the voice, the accent or the expressions, Park’s performance felt off the mark. It’s strange, but the Kim Jong-in I have in my mind just from seeing his photos and reading about him in papers is much more hilarious than the version portrayed in this movie.

Having said all that, half a decent comedy is better than a completely shit comedy all the way through. Accordingly, I have to admit that The Interview is better than I expected. There are moments of satirical brilliance scattered throughout in the first half, but the second half, perhaps constrained by the need to live up to the premise, was a dud filled with obvious gags and witless humour. So I guess you could ultimately look at The Interview in two mutually inclusive ways — a fundamentally shit film with a handful of funny-to-very-funny moments, or just another mediocre Seth Rogen movie that will make no absolutely difference to your life whether you watch it or not.

2.75 stars out of 5