Tag Archives: Abduction

Movie Review: A Walk Among the Tombstones (2014)


You can always trust Liam Neeson to find someone, then kill them.

That is why A Walk Among the Tombstones, a crime thriller based on the 1992 novel of the same name by Lawrence Block, was the perfect role for Neeson and his brooding, single-minded charisma.

Set in 1999, the film stars Neeson as Matthew Scudder, a former cop who retired eight years ago and has become an unlicensed private detective-slash-fixer or sorts. He is recruited to a drug dealer whose wife went missing, and the story opens up from there into a dark, violent journey where only Scudder’s very particular set of skills can save the day.

Don’t for one second think, however, that A Walk Among the Tombstones is anything like Taken. Yes, Neeson is a badass, but Tombstone is less action and a lot more grit and atmosphere. The first half of the film, at least, is essentially a detective film where Scudder tries to track down the sadistic perpetrators through their past crimes. He enlists the help of a street kid by the name of TJ (Brian “Astro” Bradley), whom he takes under his wing a little bit, and in return TJ acts as the catalyst for Scudder’s character development.

As the story progresses it morphs into a kidnap film, and then finally an old-fashioned action thriller. The action is relatively spare, but when there is action it is usually brutal and effective. I think director-writer Scott Frank (best known for penning screenplays to top-notch films like Minority Report, Out of Sight and Get Shorty) does an excellent job of keeping the film’s tones dark, but not so dark that it makes the film unpleasant to watch, and bloody but not gratuitously so. His direction is also quite stylish and makes an effort to bring back the feel of the 1990s.

While A Walk Among the Tombstones doesn’t exactly avoid genre cliches, it features a compelling storyline, strong direction and performances, and action and suspense at just the right pace. It certainly held my attention from start to finish. In fact, if you don’t count his cameo in The Dark Knight Rises and his voice performance in The Lego Movie, one could make the argument that Tombstones is Neeson’s best movie since Taken.

4 stars out of 5

Movie Review: Stolen (2012)

Liam Neeson’s daughter was Taken (and will be again in about another week); Nicolas Cage’s daughter is…Stolen!

I bet I’m not the only one who thought that the two movies smelled eerily similar: a kidnapped daughter; an estranged father with a certain skill-set who would do anything to get her back = an action film filled with brainless but awesome action.

But fortunately/unfortunately, that’s where the similarities end. I was actually surprised to find that Stolen, despite its  derivative title, is a completely different style of film to Taken. The latter is a dark, violent and relentless thrill ride that turned out to be one of the best action films of the last decade. The former, on the other hand, is merely an above-average, half-serious popcorn action movie starring Nicolas “I’ll do any movie for money” Cage.

Stolen‘s title is cleverer than it sounds because Cage plays Will Montgomery, “America’s greatest bank robber” (get it?). Without giving away anything more than the bare necessities, Cage’s daughter (Sami Gayle) is abducted by a vengeful village (Josh Lucas) and Will must rely on his skills to get her back with the help of former ally Riley (Malin Ackerman). Hot on his heels are a couple of inept FBI agents played by Danny Huston and Mark Valley. The result is a compact and frequently exciting 96 minutes of running around, car chases, dramatic escapes, near misses and Nic Cage being Nic Cage.

Honestly, it’s not as bad as it reads. It’s easy to be dismissive of Stolen simply because it stars Mr Cage, the Oscar winner who has in recent times delivered us such masterpieces as Ghost Rider: Spirit of VengeanceSeeking Justice, Trespass, Drive Angry, Season of the Witch and The Sorcerer’s ApprenticeBut Stolen does have its moments and is probably one of Cage’s most watchable films from the last five years.

The strangest thing with the film is that it starts off rather seriously, but becomes more and more lighthearted as it progresses, in reverse correlation to what is at stake. By the end it’s more or less a comedy — and I’m not sure if that is a good or bad thing. The film is directed by Simon West (The Expendables 2), who was also matched up with Cage in Con Air 15 years ago, and delivers a somewhat similar feel that mixes farcical situations with over-the-top action and cheesy, sarcastic humour.

Watching Stolen, however, does require one to forgo all logic and common sense. There are some pretty outrageous coincidences and situations (one involving a dislocation and another involving a dead cop) that you simply have to accept — questioning any of these things will just make the entire film fall apart. There’s also the most insulting caricature of an Australian traveller that all Aussie viewers will have to put up with for a few minutes (it might actually be the worst scene of any movie I’ve seen all year). Tanc Sade should be ashamed of himself for embarrassing all Australians by accepting a role that perpetuates the view that all Aussie travellers are obnoxious dicks who talk like Steve Irwin.

The cast (apart from the aforementioned Sade) is good but the performances are patchy. Nic Cage is Nic Cage, and you can interpret that however you want. Malin Ackerman is little more than underused eye-candy. Danny Huston feels out of place because he’s a much better actor than everyone else and he knows it. Mark Valley is effective as a twat.

The one actor that gets a paragraph all to himself is Josh Lucas. Even though he is an old hand at playing snarky villains,  I initially thought he was horribly miscast. But then I thought maybe it was just the atrocious lines he kept spewing out. And eventually I just realized he was supposed to be this hilarious. I just wish I could have figured it out sooner.

In the end, I enjoyed Stolen much more than I thought I would, and I’m not ashamed to say I did. Of course, the more I think about it the worse it gets, but the point of such movies has always been to just watch it, switch off your brain and go along for the ride.

3.25 stars out of 5

Movie Review: Abduction (2011)

Taylor Lautner’s Abduction ought to come with vomit bags.  The concept is interesting and the action is actually pretty good, but this film contains romance and dialogue so cringeworthy that it would make even Stephenie Meyer blush.

Now, before you label me a Lautner ‘hater’, I’m not.  Far from it.  I’ve been ‘Team Jacob’ all the way throughout the Twilight fan wars and I’ve even singled him out as the star performer of the last two Twilight films.  However, I’m not sure if it’s because of the overall calibre of acting in Twilight (that made him stand out) or the poor writing in Abduction (that he couldn’t avoid) but Lautner isn’t very good here at all.  Physically, he is impressive and gets to show off his martial arts skills (did you know he was a former junior world champion?), but emotionally his repertoire is limited to not much more than blank faces and heavy breathing.

Let me back track a little.  Abduction is not that bad — if you can ignore the worst offending aspects.  It tells the story of Nathan (Lautner), an athletic (and unnaturally ripped — yes, he does have a couple of gratuitous topless scenes) teenager who has a seemingly normal life until he discovers a photo of a kid that looks curiously similar to him on a missing person’s website.  Nathan begins to question who he is, and before long the CIA and deadly assassins are after him as he tries to piece together the mystery of his life.  It’s a great premise and it’s not hard to understand why the spec (ie unsolicited) script written by Shawn Christensen was sold for $1 million after it started a bidding war.

The action scenes may be unrealistic (they’re all practically indestructible in hand-to-hand combat) but they are occasionally exciting.  Lautner looks comfortable running around and punching things like a young Jason Bourne (is it blasphemous to compare?) and the choreography is fairly solid.  It’s a few notches down fromn Taken territory (most films are) but by the current standards of action films Abduction holds its own.

Super cast as well.  Maria Bello is the mother and Sigourney Weaver is the shrink.  The always welcome Alfred Molina plays a CIA agent and the original Mikael Blomkvist from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Michael Nyqvist) is the big bad baddie.

Unfortunately, Abduction is an obvious Lautner vehicle co-produced by Lautner’s family’s production company, and as such, the filmmakers felt they had to work extra hard at appealing to Lautner’s fan base — ie, teenager girls living in the Twilight dream land.  This meant a corny, persistent romance between Nathan and his neighbour/childhood friend/destined love interest, Karen, played by Lily Collins (the daughter of music legend Phil).

Apart from a pair of crazy eyebrows, Collins doesn’t offer much by way of interest or excitement.  She’s merely there so girls can picture themselves in her place when Lautner goes mentally overprotective on her (like Edward and Bella) and so Lautner’s teenage character can save her from highly trained assassin baddies.  She’s a hopeless character and is cursed with some of the worst dialogue in the film.  I am not kidding when I say I was writhing in agony in my seat during a couple of their conversations and I had to look away during one of the worst make-out scenes of all time.

And don’t get me started on the inconsistencies and continuity errors.  If even I could spot them then surely everyone could (how hard is it to maintain a limp?).

At the end of the day, while Abduction isn’t a good movie, it achieves some of the goals it set out to achieve.  Lautner got to be the main guy and the guy who gets the girl for once, he got to show off his bod and his martial arts skills, and as far as action is concerned, the film is more than adequate.  It’s all the other crap that drags Abduction down.

2.25 stars out of 5

PS: Personally, I’m happy for Mr Lautner.  He seems like a good kid who worked his butt off after he was almost replaced on New Moon by this guy and soared to become one of the hottest stars in the world.